Gaming: the outlet for illness

As someone with a chronic illness, it’s sometimes very hard to do anything about it, and even harder to keep your spirits high. I sympathise and relate to the millions across the world who suffer long-term conditions, because it poisons your mental state as well as your physical state.

I suffer from Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Irritable Bowel syndrome and depression, all three culminating in a fairly unpleasant pot. It is very difficult for many likewise sufferers to keep our spirits high. As someone with severe anxiety and depression, the mental state is at times even more important then our physical health, and therefore keeping ourselves motivated and our spirits high is incredibly difficult, but vital. My main outlet is gaming and writing, but this blog post is mainly about the games.

I firstly discovered video games back in 1998 with Age of Empires, Bio Menace, commander keen, castle of the winds etc, and its just been a huge part of my life since. Strategy, Role Playing and Simulation games are always my favourite, and this blog will be heavily used for gaming reviews and my experiences as well as a hub for my writing (Will be nice to mix it up!) I can’t thank gaming enough for helping me during the periods of darkness, it keeps me sane and my mind busy, and it helps lubricate my creative side when I work on the writing.

Just a brief blog piece this time, the next will talk a bit more deeply into my writing, with some introductions to the world I’ve been making. Gaming had a huge impact on that too!

 

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4 thoughts on “Gaming: the outlet for illness

  1. Using the Normandy in Mass Effect to visit distant solar systems was my way to leave the ground when I was housebound back in 2010. If it wasn’t for that game I’m not sure how I would’ve coped. I was studying geology at the time, and the creators of the game put so much effort into describing the planetary geology of the solar systems they created that it felt like I was going on the field trips I was missing out on at the time. Also the complexity of character interaction and the fact you could choose how to respond to your companions in game was a nice social element, especially as I had limited time to interact with friends on the phone.
    Even these days when my illness only incapacitates me for days at a time I still return to that trilogy as an outlet. Strongly agree on the importance of video games in regards to chronic illness!!

    What game, or section of a game, has left the greatest imprint on you during times of illness?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Good question holly 🙂 I’d say Skyrim probably, as a nordic-like, action RPG with a huge modding platform, it’s given me so much outlet to try new things on it, has decent gameplay and its something I can lose myself in.

      Like

  2. my boyfriend and I often discuss the benefits of gaming on multiple levels.
    His nephew is sitting in front of me right now playing Fallout 4 after working a stressful night at a stressful job.
    I bought into the whole “lazy good-fer-nuthin’ gamer” label long ago when I was young, naive, and only listened to what other people had to say. But I’ve found that it’s no different than people who hide in books or TV, healthier than hiding in drugs or alcohol, and has benefits that you can’t get from those other choices like problem solving exercises.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Very true! It’s draining and expensive but for a hobby its very endearing and releasing for the mind. For me, after a particularly hard day struggling with health, kicking back a good game can do a world of good 🙂 It’s a lot of fun too.

      Liked by 1 person

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